Radioisotopic dating parent daughter

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The only problem is that we only know the number of daughter atoms now present, and some of those may have been present prior to the start of our clock. The reason for this is that Rb has become distributed unequally through the Earth over time.We can see how do deal with this if we take a particular case. For example the amount of Rb in mantle rocks is generally low, i.e. The mantle thus has a low If these two independent dates are the same, we say they are concordant.We could be sure that a mineral containing parentium originally had no daughterium.If the mineral contained 1 part per million Parentium-123 and 3 parts per million Daughterium-123, we could be sure all the Daughterium-123 was originally Parentium-123.

In the example above, uranium is the parent element, and lead is the daughter element.But there are some questions that come to mind: Calculus students typically meet this problem somewhere in the second semester.It is one of the simplest examples of a differential equation.Imagine we have an undiscovered element, Parentium, that has a radioactive isotope, Parentium-123, which decays to stable Daughterium-123.This is the only way Parentium-123 decays, and there is no other source of Daughterium-123.

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